Brass Gym Trompa

August 14, 2017 | Author: MARINEREA | Category: Brass Instruments, Physical Exercise, French Horn, Singing, Music Theory
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French horn and brass...

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I I I

Bras

A Comprehensive Daily Workout for

rilFOCUS RMUSIC Copyright © 2008 Focus on Music, LLC All Rights Reserved

Edited by John Ericson e Photos by lvfichae1 Woodall» Art Direction by Kathleen Harrison The music, text design and graphics in this publication arc protected by copyright IHw. Any duplication or transmission, by any means, electronic, mechanical photocopying, recording O[ otherwise is an infringement of copyright.

Horn in F For a comprehensive listing of Focus on Music, LLC publications, please call 1-800-332-2637 or visit us online at www.focus-on-music.com

Note from the Editor Welcome to "The Horn Gym!" It has been my pleasure over the last year to work with Sam and Pat to "translate" The Brass Gym, which was originally developed for tuba/euphonium, for French horn. The result is simply the best comprehensive horn workout available! A few notes for the horn player: • Start low. This routine starts with a more extended workout in the mid and low range than typically seen in horn warm-ups. This is by design and is a key to this routine, as this sets up great sound production and airflow and provides a deep, longer lasting warm-up for a day of playing horn. • Play it with some non-horn friends. While this version is set up to work well on the horn, it may also be used very effectively in mixed brass situations. Several of the exercises as printed will sound a fourth or fifth away from the other instruments, which can also be an excellent way to wake up the ears of all involved. • Try rounds. Several of these exercises work wonderfully played as rounds with other players in a group setting or with the CD, especially "Smooth Air Movement," "Beautiful Sounds," and "B Bells." Rounds are also excellent for development of the ear and group intonation. • Work out "the break." "Schwarmaaaaaa" is perhaps the best exercise ever to develop a strong "break range" on the horn. While the most benefit is derived from the complete exercise, it may be shortened into bars of 3/4 or even 2/4. The middle two pages as printed are the most essential. Also, exercises like "Slamma Legato" are wonderful for development of flexibility across the break. • Light, fast tonguing. While all the fast, tongued exercises may be performed multiple tongued, as presented in this volume all exercises are intended to be single tongued. It is very important to develop a fast, light single tongue. Over train! • Trills are fast flexibility studies. For development of trills "Lip Flips" can't be beat. While you can jump around in these materials, I personally find it best to play the routine as written to "Beautiful Sounds" before moving to the more focused technical studies. Structured use of this routine will certainly increase your technical level on the horn. Enjoy!

John Ericson Editor Arizona State University

Note from the Authors

Everyone who performs or exercises or participates in an extreme activity always does some form of a warm-up. Soccer players stretch out, racecar drivers take a few warm-up laps and musicians play scales. Those people who excel at their activity, in addition to warming up, go through a routine of fundamental exercises and activities that allow them to perform at the highest level. The following method is not just a warm-up. It is a comprehensive set of exercises that, if done properly and on a consistent basis, will provide substantial growth in all areas of a musician's ability. Please take into consideration the following points before you begin using The Brass Gym. •

Always remember the Law of Accommodation: "What is difficult today, becomes easier with practice." In this Daily Routine, this can apply to tempo, range, flexibility, articulations, and many other facets of playing a brass instrument.



These exercises are not intended to be played without pause. They are designed to have stretches, breathing exercises and other activities inserted as short breaks. Many of the breathing and stretching exercises are discussed and explained in The Breathing Gym Series by Patrick Sheridan and Sam Pilafian which can be found at www.focus-on-music.corn,

Thank you for choosing The Brass Gym. We hope you learn from the information provided in this book and allow it to help you reach the ultimate goal of making great music!

Patrick Sheridan Author

Sam Pilafian Author

Table of Contents INTRODUCTION & OVERVIEW

6

PRE-WORKOUT

7

WORKING OUT WITH A PARTNER OR GROUP

8

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

9

MOUTHPIECE WORKOUT

10

CHROMATICS

14

SOFT TOUCH

18

SMOOTH AIR MOVEMENT

20

TONGUE COORDINATION

24

SHWARMAAAAAA1

26

BEAUTIFUL SOUNDS

32

BRRUUMMMMl

36

BRRUUMMMMl IN SIXTEENTH NOTES

44

BUG LES

52

BUGLES: LAST LINES

66

OLD SCHOOL FLEXES

68

LIP FLIPS UB U BELLS

82

HOW TO USE THE CD

108

CD TRACK L1STI NG

109

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

110

104

Introduction & Overview

...... -~

The key to any workout regimen is consistency. The Brass Gym contains a daily basics routine developed from a synthesis of our experiences from more than 50 combined years of touring as performers and educators throughout the world. In light of the increasing number of wind instrumentalists that find it difficult to stay healthy as a player throughout their career, we offer this workout which has kept us healthy and improving every year. The Brass Gym workout has morphed many times over the years into its current format, which we find to be the most effective application of these exercises. Many of the exercises found in this book are similar in nature or adaptations of famous exercises for brass players. The importance of the pedagogies of Herbert L. Clarke, Emory Remington and Arnold Jacobs are universal in the brass world. The exercises presented in The Brass Gym continue the tradition of these influential pedagogues.

The workout consists of exercises that cover comprehensively the basic aspects of wind Q.

playing. It can also be used as a warm-up activity as the exercises are ordered in a gentle "ramp up" with demand increasing throughout the workout. The key to any workout regimen IS consistency. We are dedicated to finding paths to performance success that allow for a journey of life long improvement. After the age of 25 our bodies start to atrophy if not exercised regularly. This concept relates directly to the physical nature of playing a wind instrument. The Brass Gym workout provides a framework in which your ability to improve is directly related to the consistency and dedication to excellent form that you bring to your practice sessions - EVERY DAY! The Brass Gym is the cornerstone to a healthy and ever improving musical life! This workout is an environment in which the basics are taught. Achievement of these basics actually allows for the workout NOT to be necessary in its entirety some days if time constraints occur.

The Brass Gym - A Cornprchcnsiic Daily Workoutfor Brass Players

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Pre-Workout There are some activities that should be done before playing the first note of this routine. It is highly recommend that stretching and breathing exercises be performed before beginning this routine. It is also recommended that these exercises be revisited during the workout. Detailed explanation of these exercises can be found in our book and DVD series, The Breathing Gym.

Air makes Buzz makes Sound. This is why we breathe before we play.

It is highly recommended that stretching and breathing exercises be performed before beginning this routine.

Horn in F

Z

Working out with a Partner or Group The Brass Gym workout is designed to be performed by an individual or in a group setting. There is great advantage to practicing your basics in a group. Most importantly, like going to the gym to work out with a trainer, the group element provides an excellent foundation for mutual support.

Performing this workout in a group will also add the elements of intonation, blend and ensemble. Make a priority for group practice in your improvement journey! A socialstructure of support in your practice life will pay huge dividends. AND -it's fun!!

lJ:IIIIII lJ:IIIIII lJ:IIIIII lJ:IIIIII

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Workout in a group is fun and puts additional emphasis on intonation and time.

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The Brass Gym

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A Comprchens;ic Daily Workout for Brass Players

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Glossary of Terms WIND PATTERN To wind pattern an exercise or song is to blow air (without buzzing the lips) out of your body in the rhythm of the music. Begin just by blowing the correct rhythms without the resistance of buzzing. As your facility increases, add all the elements of the music to the sound of your wind pattern. (i.e. dynamics, articulations, crescendo/decrescendo, releases, etc.) HALF VALVE This technique refers to playing on your instrument with your valves depressed half way for every note. The result is a "plugged up" tone to your playing. This makes the instrument "fretless" and increases the strength of your ears. It is an intense exercise and should be done infrequently and with discretion.

BREATH ATTACK This term refers to executing the beginning of a note without the use of your tongue. Any pitch can begin by using airflow only. By eliminating the tongue, a smooth, even wall of air can be delivered without interruption. Exercising in this wayan a note or a phrase stabilizes the pitch and resonance of a player's tone and improves a player's oral shape. FLOW To move air in a manner that simulates breathing patterns used in playing wind instruments. The goal is to move air without resistance or tension, sometimes quickly and sometimes over longer periods of time, to make the most music possible in each phrase. LAW OF ACCOMMODATION What is difficult today will become easier ifpracticed! Continue to lift the level ofdifficulty and practice until this becomes easier. Repeat this process until the desired virtuosity is achieved. SINGING GROOVE Internalizing tempos is extremely important for all musicians. To perform with others we must have a unanimous opinion about the pulse to be used. The accurate execution of all musical rhythms is based on this internalized pulse. We strongly recommend singing imaginary drum beats (groove) to the suggested tempo of any selection you are practicing for several minutes to gain a tempo steadiness and recall of that tempo in the future. TEMPO OF THE DAY This term applies to the speed of the articulation studies used in our daily workouts. These exercises (with the exception of "Soft Touch") are progressive and will escalate in speed using the Law of Accommodation. The tempo of the day should be moved upward in small increments when comfort at "today's" speed has been experienced for several days. Then it is time to move up the tempo and grow!

Horn i11 F

2.

Mouthpiece

rout

After spending some time motivating your air via breathing exercises, mouthpiece buzzing is an excellent first musical application of your airflow. Buzzing in the middle to low register at a specific pitch is an excellent way to start. These exercises are to be performed with glissando between the notes. Performing these exercises with glissando will fill in any holes in your buzz spectrum. This "filling in" will increase your abilities for micro intonation. These exercises will also promote more rich, beautiful, resonant tone as there will be a true buzz for each pitch. If the keys presented here are too low to buzz, then choose keys near the lowest part of your current buzzing capability. A good place to start may be a fifth higher than these exercises. Buzzing is an intense exercise. Care needs to be taken not to overdo the amount of time spent buzzing your mouthpiece. For every 30 seconds of mouthpiece buzzing, rest for at least 1 minute. (You can fill this minute with stretching, breathing or singing!) The main point of buzzing your mouthpiece is to create vibration with less resistance than the horn provides. So, buzzing your mouthpiece is an air motivator! Each part of the mouthpiece exercise should take a maximum of 1 to 2 minutes!

Daily practice of this routine will promote air efficiency of your BUZZ.

Tips and Suggestions

10



Always glissando evenly between the notes.



On alternate days, replace Part II, III or IV with 1 to 2 minutes buzzing simple melodies such as The Star Spangled Banner, Silent Night, Brahms' Lullaby, Yankee Doodle or Take Me Out to the Ballgame. Try buzzing the melodies accurately and cleanly. As an alternative, try buzzing the same melodies while creating glissando between every pitch.



Play Part III and IV on a mouthpiece rim for promoting buzz under less resistance than the mouthpiece. Continue to glissando between notes.



Each measure should be performed in one breath eventually. In the beginning, breathe where necessary to stay comfortable.

The Brass Gym - A Comprehensive Daily vVorkout for Brass Players

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11

Notes:

The goal is a big, full, efficient BUZZ!!

Hom in F

13

...... Chromatics Inspired by Herbert L. Clarke, these soft chromatic passages are an outstanding way to start a day of playing. Movement first thing in a workout promotes finesse and flexibility throughout the day. The indicated soft dynamic range is imperative in order to access the benefit this exercise offers.

Tips and Suggestions •

Smooth air movement - constant and even walls of musical air!



Air is always moving. Use the entire rest to inhale evenly in an "Oh" shape.



Clean and smooth connections between each note



Confident fingers - in order to avoid rough slurs, use marcato fingers in legato music. Armando Ghitalla described it as "pounding the valves."

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Stay within the indicated dynamic range throughout the exercise.



Imagine playing this exercise as smooth and connected as a fine pianist, then change your sound achievement by imagining this exercise performed on a fretless string instrument such as the cello or string bass.

ljIIII! ljIIII!

...... ...... ...... .... .-..-.. .... ljIIII! ljIIII!

~ ~

Perform this exercise softly to gain access to fluidity early in your workout!

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The BraJJ· Gym - A Comprehensive Daily Work,out for Bruss Players

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Soft Toue This exercise should be performed as softly as a clean articulation can be achieved to promote a soft, clear articulation right from the beginning of the day.

Remember: Tension kills tone! Playing softly is not holding air back. Rather, it is blowing air slowly. Relax in all registers to stay resonant on every note.

Tips and Suggestions •

Try wind patterning this exercise first. Use your hand to monitor the quality of your air movement and timing.



Always perform this exercise staccato. Take time to direct your attention to your ears by imagining the perfect staccato from other instruments like an oboe, muted trumpet or xylophone. Do this imagination exercise before each scale is performed.



Choose different keys every day and vary the type of scales to stay fluent in your harmonic knowledge. Do at least two to three different scales each workout.



Perform this exercise as soft as controllable. Remember the LAW OF ACCOMMODATION as you improve. If you are comfortable at your present dynamic, try to go softer.

Wind pattern this exercise to promote ease of air delivery. 18

The Brass Gym - A Comprchcnsiue Daily Worl(out for Brass Players

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CD TRACKS 3 - 5

"Major"

41

J= 50- 70

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Use these types of scales as a starting point for working out your ears beyond major scales. Choose different keys and types of scales every day! "Natural Minor" (etc.)

J.-~f,f,~ ~ "Harmonic Minor"

(etc.)

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"Melodic Minor"

(etc.)

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"Diminished" (whole step first) (etc.)

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"Whole Tone"

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(etc.)

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Horn in F

19

Smooth Air

ovemen

The goal of breathing exercises that mimic the flow encountered on your instrument (FLOW EXERCISES) is to produce air movement that is even and constant through an oral shape of"Oh" with smooth transitions between inhalation and exhalation. This is an exercise in TONE! This is basically a "4 in, 12 out" wind pattern put to sound. The range used in this exercise incorporates the highest amount of airflow used by a player. Achievement on this exercise will produce smooth low register playing that is tension free. Treat every line like a musical phrase that is played ever more beautifully!

Tips and Suggestions

Smooth

Air



Stay III constant motion in this exercise. Air is either moving in or out of your body.



Ultra legato thoughts will produce ultra legato sound.



Confident fingers in order to avoid rough slurs, use marcato fingers in legato music.



Breathe before you NEED it to remain relaxed always.



Try HALF-VALVING a line of this exercise to ensure your ears hear this pattern.



Try WIND PATTERNING a line of this exercise occasionally throughout the routine to promote a high volume of relaxed airflow.



This is a musical exercise. Make flowing music!



If the bottom note of this pattern becomes too low, flip up the bottom note an octave as indicated in the example below.

Movement

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20

The Brass Gym - A Comprehensive Daily Workout for Brass Players

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Tongue Coordination The pursuit for technique at high velocity requires tongue coordination. This starts with single tonguing. Increasing single tongue coordination is a progressive activity that requires a lot of patience! It is a skill that improves slowly in small increments and only gets better with consistent practice. Increased coordination has the obvious benefit of improving quick articulated passages. The added benefit ofthis coordination journey is highly improved clarity on articulations at much slower speeds!

Tips and Suggestions •

This exercise should be practiced using three styles of articulation: staccato, marcato and legato.



Choose different keys every day and vary the types of scales to stay fluent in your harmonic knowledge.



Perform this exercise three times: lst time -1lJI[1 2nd time - JTif 3rd time ----f



WIND PATTERN this exercise with attention on moving air through beats 3 and 4.



Use a quick breath after the two eighth notes in each bar.



Practice this as a wind pattern.



Further improve coordination by working on quick breath exercises.



The quickest and cleanest technique comes from excellent air. Use the articulation, tOH, rather than Toh.



Remember the LAW OF ACCOMMODATION! Start slowly and increase speed in small increments no larger than 4 bpm. Once tempos above J= 136 are attained cleanly, decrease the increment of change to a 2 bpm increase.

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WIND PATIERN this exercise. 24

The Brass Gym - A Comprehensive Daily ·Workout for Brass Players

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Shwarmaaaaaa!

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.. .. .., ~ ~

The following flow exercise has multiple benefits for our ears and air. On brass instruments, the majority of our favorite notes (the "good" ones) are right next to the "bad" notes that are "difficult" to play. By moving through this exercise in half steps we learn to clone the sounds of our favorite notes. This will homogenize the sound you produce on your instrument. The lips bends in the second bar allow younger players to gain more control in their embouchure. For more advanced players, the bend forces a scrambling of the tone and pitch which must be declared in the third and fourth bar. These lips bends are the building blocks of micro intonation. The lip bends will also open up your tone.

This is the most important tone building exercise in this workout regimen.

Tips and Suggestions •

Stay in constant motion in this exercise. Air is either moving in or out of your body.



This is a "4 in, 16 out" WIND PATTERN in sound. Practice your breathing form on this pattern to increase your achievement in tone.



Breathe before you NEED it to remain relaxed always.



Try wind patterning a line of this exercise occasionally throughout the routine to promote a higher volume of relaxed airflow.



Go as low as you are able in this exercise. Very low range practice promotes greater response and control throughout the entire range.



Try lip bends in both directions to increase micro intonation abilities

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flI' flI' flI' flI' flI' flI' flI'

flI' flI' flI' flI' flI' fill fill fill fill

Shwarmaaaaaa?? 26

The Brass Gym - A Comprehensive Daily

~Vorl(out for

Brass PlaYC1:i

.. .. .. .. ..

Notes:

Stay in time or the Time Cops will get you!

Hom in F

31

Beautiful

nds

Inspired by our teacher, Arnold Jacobs, this Beautiful Sound exercise promotes the smoothest possible air movement while using your most beautiful tone. Use variable dynamics and tempos to access greater facility with a sustained and steady airflow at slower tempos and smooth movement through the phrase in all registers at faster tempos. This exercise is your model for achievement in sound.

Tips and Suggestions

32



Before any line in this sequence, it is advisable to sing, buzz on a mouthpiece, buzz on a rim, or WIND PATTERN this musical phrase.



Wind patterning each line prior to playing it promotes smooth, legato sound when the line is performed.



Ease is the key to beautiful sound - large volumes of air, small amount of body effort.



Imagine your favorite musical sound to make music more easily.



Try to improve on every line of the exercise.



This is a "4 in, 16 out" wind pattern in sound. Practice your breathing form on this pattern to increase your achievement in tone. Quick breathing coordination will be necessary to access ease and beauty on this phrase, in the extreme low register.



Play this exercise much slower by doubling the length of the notes to quarter and double whole notes. This will provide a challenging environment for the study of sustain.

1. Sing the

2. Buzz on a

Phrase

mouthpiece

3. Buzz on a rim

The Brass Gym - A Comprehensive Daily vVorkouttor Brass Players

4. Wind Pattern

5. Play the phrase

Brruummmm! This extremely quick slurred exercise works to develop confident fingers and slurred technique at high velocity. Daily execution will teach you to think and move ever quicker and will give you confidence when you encounter difficult technical passages. Smooth, even airflow is the key to success on this exercise!

Tips and Suggestions •



The reference tempo (tempo of the day) for these patterns is your current personal tempo for a series of clean single tongued sixteenth notes. (See "Tongue Coordination" on page 24) Be sure to have confident fingers.



WIND PATTERN this exercise to promote sustained airflow while moving your valves quickly.



It is more important to move at speed and allow the detail to become clearer via repetition than it is to slow practice this exercise.



Variable dynamics are suggested.



Make up your own patterns to keep this part of the workout fresh and creative.



Relax your fingers and your arms - a lack of tension in these limbs is necessary to access excellent technique.

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The Brass Gym - A Comprchcnsiuc Daily 'Workout for Brass Players

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18 Reference the tempo ofyour clean sixteenth note single tonguing for an appropriate tempo for this exercise. (See "Tongue Coordination on page 24) JJ

Key Cycle: F B~

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A~ D~ G~ B E A D G C ~

"One5"

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71y these scale variations to challenge your fingering finesse and stay harmonically fit!

"One 5 - Lydian" (#4)

~~. ~§)i~!~~ (etc)

p-f "One 5 - Minor" (~3) (specify which type of minor for extended patterns)

"One 5 - Whole Tone" (#4, #5)

~~\,~!~~ (etc.)

J?

¥

p-f Hom in F

37

Brruummmm! i

I

These exercises are the same patterns as Brruummmrn] except this is another single tonguing coordination exercise. Finger and tongue coordination is the goal. Strive for a smooth airflow while engaging just enough tongue to make each articulation clear. The faster the tempo the more light the tongue should be.

Tips and Suggestions •

The reference tempo for these patterns is your current personal tempo for a series of clean single tongued sixteenth notes. (See "Tongue Coordination" on page 24)



Be sure to have confident fingers



WIND PATTERN this exercise to promote sustained airflow while moving your valves quickly.

44



Stay relaxed. Avoid getting too excited which results in over tonguing.



If difficulty arises as the pattern goes along, alternate tonguing and slurring on each line.



Variable dynamics are suggested.



Make up your own patterns to keep this part of the workout fresh and creative.



Relax your fingers and your arms - a lack of tension in these limbs is necessary to access excellent technique.

The Brass Gym - A Comprchensioc Daily 'Workout for Brass Players

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Key Cycle: F B~ E~ A~ D~ G~ B E A D G C "One 5"

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~~

Try these scale variations to challenge yourfingering finesse and stay harmonically fit!

"One 5 - Lydian" (#4)

...

~ ..

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(etc.)

~~l~~

"One 5 - Minor" (b3) (specify "which type of minor for extended patterns) (etc.)

p-f

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"One 5 - Diminished" (b3, bS) (whole step first)

(etc.) . '. . " ~~~~~~!:~~ .. . .. . ..

p-f "One 5 - Whole Tone" (#4, #5)

(etc.)

p-f Horn in F

45

Bugles Many brass legends started their musical careers as buglers. The study of the overtone series that makes up our brass instruments is an excellent platform for promoting evenness in our sound throughout all registers. In these exercises, range building is also accomplished, Fingerings for bugle exercises on the longer part of our instruments (23, 13, 123, etc) are particularly challenging to execute smoothly in the middle and upper register. We ask you to make your best sound in a bad, tight situation. After completing a bugle exercise, play in the low, middle and upper register with your optimal fingerings and you will find your sound to be more centered and open.

Tips and Suggestions •

Use the same fingering throughout a bugle exercise. (i.e., on page 53 the entire excercise is performed with the open fingering on the horn.



Play each phrase as smooth as possible. Strive for fluid connections ascending and descending each bugle.



Try to play each phrase as far as CC)MFC)RTABLY possible in one breath.



Try not to breath after the second octave. (fifth quarter note of each phrase).



Play each line as written and do not dwell on the upper register notes. It is important to move from low to high AND back to low again when range building.



Alternate between the study of 3 - 4 complete bugles per day and performing only the "last lines" of each exercise. This is presented on pages 66 and 67.

evenness 52

The Brass Gym - A Comprchcnsiic Daily "VVorkoU! for Brass Players

.,. .,. WFI! WFI!

...... ...... ...... ...... ........ ...... --...--

o

Bugles:

I

Here is the last line ofeach bugle exercise. Play through this seriesfor the ultimate range building challenge! Stay smooth and relaxed!

Key Cycle: F B~

It

A~ D~ G~ B E A D G C

"1" Last Line" (2 or 4 beat breath)

... ~ ~

ltB~ Last Line" ~/

"A~ Last Line"

66

The Brass Gym - A Comprchcnsiuc Daily rVorkout for Brass Players

(etc.)

Old School Flexibility exercises are crucial to a daily workout to encourage fluidity on your instrument. Often, players avoid this type of workout because they have determined that flexibility exercises wear them out creating tired, ineffective chops. This situation CAN occur, which is a result of extra muscular efforts. Flexibilities must be executed with great ease! These exercises are not an overly muscular event, but rather FLOW exercises with slurred technique. Begin the study of these exercises slowly. The achievement headline is smoothness. When smoothness has been achieved, gradually increase the velocity. As in the Tongue Coordination exercises, do not increase the tempo until mastery is achieved at each tempo. As the fingering combinations lower throughout each exercise make sure smoothness is always addressed.

Tips and Suggestions

68



Muscular fatigue in your embouchure is an indication of poor breathing form rather than a lack of stamina. Put your thoughts on airflow and RELAX!



Check your ears by singing each exercise accurately.



HALF VALVE each exercise to ensure airflow is smooth and tension free.



Practice these exercises using a varied range of dynamics.



Perform these exercises as smoothly and cleanly as possible.



Relax! Using smooth airflow and listening carefully will produce excellence in flexibility!



There are t\VO \vays to perform these exercises in the group workout setting.



Alternate your workout routine daily between Old School Flexes and Lip Flips.

The Brass Gym - A Comprehensive Daily Workout for Brass Players

Lip Ii Lip Flips are another form of flexibility exercise. These exercises are the seeds of ease in flexibility. Achievement in this chapter will help to produce fluid, even lip slurs and will develop into a fine lip trill with practice. Rernember the LAW OF ACCOMMODATION! .As each tempo becomes easy - slowly increase the speed. Push yourself to new limits of velocity without tension. The first eight exercises presented are shortened. They represent the common bugles across the most common keys of brass instruments. ( B\ E\ F and C) These are suitable for performing in unison in a group setting. Their abbreviated nature makes air management for these exercises easier. Achieve excellence on these exercises first. As your ability increases, proceed to the full Lip Flips. These exercises (starting on page 86) visit the entire overtone series. The length of these Lip Flips will require quick breathing coordination for air management]

.... .... ... .... .....

...... ..... ...... .,..... tJIII! tJIII!

...

82

The Brass Gym - A Comprehensiic Daily 'Workout for Brass Players

Tips and Suggestions •

Do not increase the tempo until smoothness is achieved.



Muscular fatigue in your embouchure is an indication of poor breathing form rather than a lack of stamina. Put your thoughts on airflow and RELAX!



Check your ears by singing each exercise accurately.



Half valve each exercise to ensure airflow is smooth and tension free.



Practice these exercises using a varied range of dynamics.



Relax ! Using smooth airflow listening carefully will produce excellence in flexibility.



Alternate your workout routine daily between Old School Flexes and Lip Flips.



Try this simplified version of the exercise to adjust to new tempos. (etc.)



Reverse the direction of the exercise as an alternate version.

n!

Hom in F

83

" B" Here is an exercise to affirm the effects of vour workout routine .l\ND to instill confidence In a variety of dynamics and articulations for the performance day. ~

Each exercise is performed three tirnes: 1- mp legato (can be executed slurred or legato tongued)

2- ff marcato 3- pp staccato (using four sixteenth notes per beat of the exercise instead of quarter notes)

By changing key centers and chord qualities as suggested on page 105, the player will mernor ize the architecture of these exercises and be able to play each line with better linear intonation in all keys, more even tone quality at all dynamics, and a more matched articulation throughout the instrument's registers.

Tips and Suggestions Exaggerate all dynarnics and articulations! This exercise is for control and confidence. Challenge yourself! Try these exercises with section or group members before rehearsals and performances to build unanimity of dynamics, articulations and balances. On a "heavy workout" day, play each line to the top note i\ND return to the first note by playing backwards! (Double your FUN)! Try singing each 1ine for ear training and the prograrnming of your musical intent to plav the written dvnamics and articulations. ., ~

r 104

The Brass Gym -,4 Comprchcnsioe Daily vVorkout for Brass Players

BONUS! When playing this exercise with others, three formats are available for an interesting exploration of intonation and balance: 1. Play the exercise in unison as an exercise for better intonation and a chance to agree upon the dynamic levels used in each key. 2. If t~TO people (or two teams) are playing "B" Bells, team 2 should play each line as a round starting on team 1's third note. This provides wonderful two part intervals sounded together throughout the exercise line, culminating in a unison fermata ending. Intonation and balance can be improved simply by providing an environment in which the players try to best execute the vertical intervals presented. 3. If more than two players are participating, a round can be made of each line in these exercises by starting each player one quarter note apart until all are playing. The rich harmonic environment provides a chance to fit each note into the tonality being sounded, culminating in a unison fermata at the end of each line.

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Horn in F

105

How to use the CD The CD that accompanies The Brass Gym is exercises are intended as demonstrations and designed to demonstrate the exercises in the should be mastered beginning with slower book and serve as a helpful practice tool. tempi that progress to quicker tempi. The Patrick Sheridan and Sam Pilafian, the ren1~unlng exercises are presented at their co-authors, perform the exercises on the (~D. optimal tern po. The majority of the exercises are performed in octaves by Patrick and Sam, which allow the listener to perform the exercises in an environment that will promote better intonation, time and blend! Every exercise on the CD is preceded by a description and accompanied by a click track throughout to promote rhythmic stability. The tempos on the CD for the Tongue Coordination, Brrurnmmm, and the flexibility

One of the unique features of the CD is the drone tracks. (Smooth Air Movement (Track 7), Shwarmaaaal (Track 15), and Beautiful Sounds (Track 17)) The primary purpose of the drone tracks is to provide a pitch reference point throughout the exercise. The performer should utilize these tracks to measure each interval against the drone. Have fun performing with the authors and have a great workout!

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108

The Brass Gynl - A Comprehensive Daily T

2.

CHROMATICS

3.

SOFT TOUCH - C MAJOR

4.

SOFT TOUCH - BI> MAJOR

5.

SOFT TOUCH - F WHOLE TON E

6.

SMOOTH AIR MOVEMENT

7.

SMOOTH AIR MOVEMENT - DRONE

8.

TONGUE COORDINATION - C MAJOR

J = 100

J = 100 10. TONGUE COORDINATION - C MAJOR J = 120

9.

TONGUE COORDINATION - BI> MAJOR

11.

TONGUE COORDINATION - BI> MAJOR

12. 13.

J = 144 TONGUE COORDINATION - BI> MAJOR J = 144

14.

SHWARMAAAAAJ

15.

SHWARMAAAAAJ - DRONE

16.

BEAUTIFUL SOUNDS

17.

BEAUTIFUL SOUNDS - DRONE

18.

BRRUMMMMI - "ONE 5"

19.

BRRUMMMMJ - "TWO 5'S AND A 9"

20.

BRRUMMMMJ - "ONE 5"

21.

BRRUMMMMI - "TWO 5'S AND A 9"

22.

BRRUMMMMI IN 16TH

23.

BRRUMMMMI IN 16TH NOTES - "TWO 5'S AND A 9"

24.

BRRUMMMMJ IN 16TH NOTES - "ONE 5"

25.

BRRUMMMMJ IN 16TH NOTES - "TWO 5'S AND A 9"

26.

BRRUMMMMI IN 16TH NOTES - "ONE 5"

27.

BRRUMMMMI IN 16TH NOTES - "TWO 5'S AND A 9"

J=

120

TONGUE COORDINATION - C MAJOR

J = 120

J=

J = 120

144

J = 144 NOTES - "ONE 5" J = 100 J=

120

28.

BUGLES - C BUGLES - BI>

30.

BUGLES - GI>

31.

OLD SCHOOL FLEXES - ROOT

32.

OLD SCHOOL FLEXES - THIRD

33.

OLD SCHOOL FLEXES - FIFTH

34.

SLAMMA LEGATO

35.

REMINGTON'S MOGULS

36.

LIP FLIPS - MAJOR 3RD

37.

LIP FLIPS - PERFECT 4TH (ALTERNATE VERSION)

38.

LIP FLIPS - WHOLE STEP

39.

"B" BELLS - BI> MAJOR

40.

"B" BELLS IN CANON - BI> MAJOR track titles are in concert pitch.

J = 120

J = 144

29.

* All

J = 100

J = 144

Horn in F

109

bout the A th rs

Sam Pilafian (left) is perhaps best known as a founding member of the internationally renowned Empire Brass Quintet. He has also recorded and performed with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, the Orchestra of St. Luke's, the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Duke Ellington Orchestra, Lionel Hampton, and Pink Floyd. As a solo jazz artist, Sam has recorded fifteen CI)s. Solo recital and concerto performances during recent seasons have taken him to Canada, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Japan, Italy, Austria, Gerrnany and England. As an arranger, corn poser and recording producer, Sam has recently produced and written for Joseph Alessi (New York Philharmonic), the Boston Brass, the Brass Band of Battle Creek, the Academy (of Drum Corp International), and the United States Air Force Band. Sam is the coauthor with Patrick Sheridan of the best selling pedagogy text "Breathing Gym". In 1967, Sam won the concerto competition at the National Music Camp in Interlochen, Michigan, becoming only the second tubist in over fifty years to do so. He subsequently won fellowships at Dartmouth College and the Tanglewood Music Center. While at Tanglewood he was invited by Leonard Bernstein to perform on-stage in the world premiere of Bernstein's 1vlASS, which opened the John F. Kennedy Center for the Perforrning Arts. He is currently Professor of Music and I)irector of the ABU Jazz Reparatory Band at Arizona State University, having previously served for twenty years on the faculties of Boston University and their summer Tanglewood Institute. Sam has won the Walter Naumberg Chamber Music Award, the Harvard Music Association Prize, the University of Miami's Distinguished Alumni Award, the Brevard Music Center Distinguished Alumni Award, the

Robert Trotter Annual Visiting Professorship at the University of Oregon, the annual Outstanding Teacher Award for the College of Fine Arts, Arizona State University, and a 2006 Spirit of Disney award for creativity and design awarded by Drum Corps International. Sam is a former president and chairman of the board of the International Tuba Euphonium Association. Sa111 is the Co-Director of the Institute for Performance Success, Associate Conductor and Chief Arranger with the Salt River Brass Band, and ,IS a design consultant for Jupiter Band Instruments. Patrick Sheridan (right) is one of the most celebrated tuba soloists in his instrument's history. He has performed more than 3,000 concerts in over 50 countries in venues ranging frorn the White House to NBA half-time shows to the Hollywood Bowl. He is a former member of "The President's Own" United States Marine Band and has been featured on NBC's "Today Show" and NPR's "All Things Considered." Beyond his busy performing life, Patrick's commitment to education is extensive. His wind students occupy positions in major international ensembles. In 2001, Patrick founded The Institute for Performance Success. This unique educational resource is dedicated to bringing fresh and innovative learning technologies to performers and educators in search of peak performance. Patrick currently serves on the music faculties at Arizona State University and UCLA. He is a design consultant for Jupiter Band Instruments. In the community, Patrick is also the Music Director of The Salt River Brass and the conductor of the Sonic Winds, Patrick is a member of ASCAP, an honorary member of Kappa Kappa Psi and a Trustee of The International Music Camp.

110 The Brass Gym - A Comprchcnsiuc Daily }Vorkoutfor Bra:;:; Players

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JOIN TWO OF THE WORLD'S MOST PROMINENT MUSIC EDUCATORS AND PERFORMERS in their daily basics workout developed to put you on a path to an ever improving musical life! Created and developed for their own performing careers, Sam and Patrick show you a fun and creative approach to practicing the basics.

Go get your horn and let's workout in The Brass Gym!

This is THE teaching method on breathing your way to musical success! These exercises for Band, Chorus and Orchestral Winds will have you and your students stretching, breathing, moving and having fun with two of the world's greatest wind players!

Available on DVD and VHS with method book.

Find out why thousands of music educators and performers the world call The Breathing Gym "revolutionary!"

For more information about us, call Focus on Music at 1-800-332-2637 Or visit us at our website at: www.focus-on-music.com

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